Grades 2-3

Los Rayos 

The Los Rayos group is a diverse group of learners ranging from ages 7-8 years (2nd and 3rd grade); the Learning Outcomes are expected to be met by approximately the end of the student’s eighth year. They are emerging from the concrete stage of learning and can understand more complex concepts and symbolism. They are gaining confidence and their friends are playing a more and more important role in their lives. They are expected to remain focused for increased amounts of instruction time and to be active participants in learning.

Grade 2 Learning Outcomes

Core concepts and outcomes are listed below by subject. For more detailed information on indicators, please contact the school.

MATH

I can count within 1000
I can count in multiples of 3, 4, and 100 within 1000
I can count in multiples of:

·      10 forward from any given number to 100

·      10 backward from other multiples of 10

·      10 backward from any given number

I can read in numerals that are multiple of 3
I can recognize:

·      place value of digits in 2 digit number

·      Place value of digits in 3 digit numbers

I can compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; using greater than, less than, and = sign
I can compare and order 3 digit numbers up to 1000 using greater than, less than, and = sign
I can represent numbers up to 100
I can represent:

·      Addition to 100

·      Subtraction within 100

I can use place value to solve addition and subtraction problems
I can add using objects/ pictorial representations:

·      Add TU+U up to 100

·      Add TU+T up to 100

·      Add TU+TU up to 100

·      Add U+U+U

I can add within 100 to solve two-step problems
I can add up to four 2 digit numbers using place value
Add within 1000
I can show that addition of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot
I can create a word problem using a whole number for addition
I can answer 2 step problems using addition
I can subtract

·      TU+U up to 100

·      TU+T up to 100

·      TU+TU up to 100

·      U+U+U

I can subtract within 100 to solve two-step problems

I can subtract up to four 2-digit numbers using place value

I can subtract within 1000

I can show that addition of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another can not

I can answer 2 step problems using subtraction

I can recognize inverse relationships between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations

I can use inverse relations to solve missing number problems

I can use inverse relationships between addition and subtraction to check calculations

I can recall multiples of 2, 5, 10, 3, 4

I can recognize even and odd

I can group odd and even numbers.

I can solve multiplication and division problems by writing them using the (X, %, =)

I can show that multiplication of 2 numbers can be done in any order (

I can show that division of 2 numbers cannot be done in any order

I can solve one-step multiplication problems using:

·      arrays with the help of a teacher (up to 5 rows by 5 columns)

·      Materials and arrays independently (up to 5 rows by 5 columns)

·      repeated addition  (within 40)

·      multiplication and division facts

·      In contexts

I can solve one-step division problems using:

·      pictorial representation

·      arrays with the help of a teacher (up to 5 rows by 5 columns)

·      materials and arrays independently (up to 5 rows by 5 columns)

·      multiplication and division facts in contexts

·      A third one of 3 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

·      Three quarters 3 of 4 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

I can find:

·      A third one of 3 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

·      Three quarters 3 of 4 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

I can name:

·      A third one of 3 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

·      Three quarters 3 of 4 equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

I can write:

·      1/3 of a length, shape, objects or quantity.

·      1/4 of a length, shape, objects or quantity.

·      2/4 of a length, shape, objects or quantity.

·      3/4 of a length, shape, objects or quantity.

I can write:

·      Half (2/4 and 1/2)

·      Quarter (1/4 and 2/8)

·      Third (1/3 and 2/6)

I can recognize equivalents of:

·      Half (2/4 and 1/2)

·      Quarter (1/4 and 2/8)

·      Third (1/3 and 2/6)

I can record my measurements for:

·      Length/height (mm, cm) using rulers

·      Weight/Mass (kg, g or lbs?) using scales

·      Capacity/volume (ml/liters) using measuring vessels.

·      Time using stop watches.

·      Temperature (Celsius or Fahrenheit?) using thermometers

I can estimate and measure:

·      Length/height

·      Weight/Mass

·      Capacity/volume

·      Time

I can compare and order:

·      Lengths

·      Mass

·      Volume/capacity

I can compare lengths, mass and volume using the greater than, less than and equal sign.

I can combine amounts of Cordoba’s to make a particular value.

I can find different combinations of amounts of coins that equal the same amount of money

I can solve problems involving

·      Addition of money in the same unit

·      Subtraction of money in the same unit

·      Addition and subtraction giving change

I can compare and sequence intervals of time

I can tell and write the time to:

·      5 minutes

·      Quarter past the hour

·      Quarter to the hour

Draw the above times on a clock face

I know the number of minutes in an hour

I know the amount of hours in a day

I can name:

·      Vertices

·      Edges

·      Faces

·      Symmetry

I can identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes finding:

·      Number of sides

·      Line of symmetry in a vertical line

I can identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes finding:

·      Number of edges

·      Number of vertices

·      Number of faces

I can form with cut outs semicircles and quarter circles

I can order and arrange objects in patterns and sequences

I can use math vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement:

·      Including movement in a straight line

·      Rotation as a turn in terms of right angles for a quarter, a half and ¾ turn

I can interpret:

·      Pictograms

·      Tally charts

·      Block diagrams

·      Simple tables

I can construct:

·      Pictograms

·      Block diagrams

·      Simple tables

I can count and sort data by:

·      Counting the number of objects in each category

·      Sorting the categories by quantity

·      Asking simple questions about categories

·      Answering simple questions about categories.

·      Answering questions involving totaling and comparing category data.

LITERACY & LANGUAGE ARTS

  • Asks and answers questions
  • Listens for information
  • Participates in group discussions
  • Identifies command, asking, or exclamation sentences
  • Uses description when writing
  • Make new words by adding -ness and -er at the end of a word. I can make new words by putting two words together e.g. whiteboard, superman.
  • Make new words by adding -ful, -less to the end of a word e.g. helpful, helpless.
  • Add these letter groups to the end of words: -er, -est, -ly e.g. smoother, smoothest, smoothly.
  • Use these words in my writing: when, if, that, because, and, or, but.
  • Use description in my writing e.g. the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon.
  • Uses paragraphs
  • Determine if a sentence is a question or command.
  • Use the correct tense in my writing.
  • Use the correct verb form to indicate actions in progress in the present time or in the past e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting.
  • Use capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to show where sentences start and end.
  • Use commas when I am writing a list.
  • Use apostrophes. Show where letters are missing and to show possession e.g. the girl’s hat.

 

SCIENCE

Life Systems: Growth and Changes in Animals (AN)

  • Analyze the growth and development of familiar animals, including birds, fish, insects, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals, during their life cycles.
  • Compare the growth and development of humans with that of familiar animals.
  • Assess the interdependence of humans and animals in natural and constructed environments.

Earth Systems: What Earth is made of (EM)

  • Investigate what our local environment is made from and how it was formed.

Earth Systems: Soils in the environment (ES)

  • Investigate the characteristics, including soil composition and ability to absorb water, of different types of soils in their environment.
  • Analyze the interdependence between soil and living things, including the importance of soil for individuals, society, and all components of the environment.

Physical Science: Liquids and Solids (LS)

  • Investigate properties (e.g., color, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids.
  • Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions.

Physical Science: Motion and Relative Position (MP)

  • Analyze methods of determining the position of objects relative to other objects.
  • Investigate factors, including friction, which affect the motion of natural and constructed objects, including self.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Interactions and Interdependence of Nations (IN)

  • Determine characteristics of a community.
  • Create a representation of the diversity of cultural groups in the local community.

Dynamic Relationships (DR)

  • Investigate stories of significant events and persons in the local community’s history to describe the contribution of those who lived in the community in earlier times.
  • Analyze the influence of the natural environment on the local community.
  • Identify physical representations as constructed models of real things.

Power and Authority (PA)

  • Analyze how decisions are made within the local community.
  • Assess and practise various approaches to resolving conflicting interests within the community.

Resources and Wealth (RW)

  • Describe ways in which the local community meets needs and wants of its members.
  • Analyze various worldviews regarding the natural environment.
  • Contribute to initiating and guiding change in local and global communities regarding environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

 

HEALTH

Personal and Family Health

  • Living in a growing and changing family
  • Understanding that families are special and different in their own ways
  • Analyzing families on TV
  • Recognizing that families can help their members be healthy
  • Choosing healthy role models
  • Identifying troublesome feelings
  • Getting help with troublesome feelings
  • Understanding a growing and changing body
  • Preventing colds
  • Washing hands to be healthy
  • Preventing cuts and burns
  • Treating cuts and burns

Safety and Injury Prevention

  • Identifying safe people, places and things
  • Choosing to be smart and safe
  • Being safe on the street
  • Advocating for safe behaviors
  • Being safe as a passenger
  • Understanding how strong emotions can influence safety choices
  • Being safe when home alone
  • Being safe around water
  • Being safe on a bike
  • Making Bike Smart decisions
  • Expressing intentions to be safe

Nutrition and Physical Activity

  • Drinking plenty of water every day
  • Advocating for others to drink water
  • Eating breakfast every day
  • Setting a goal to eat healthy breakfast foods
  • Choosing fruits and vegetables as healthy snacks
  • Setting a goal to eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day
  • Celebrating your body
  • Setting a goal to exercise and stretch every day

Tobacco and Alcohol Prevention

  • Understanding dangers of all forms of tobacco
  • Understanding addiction
  • Dealing with tobacco use by family
  • Choosing to be tobacco free
  • Getting support for being tobacco free

 

PROJECT TIME
The following six units of inquiry are the foundation of the project time program:

Who we are, Where we are in place and time, How we express ourselves, How the world works, How we organize ourselves, and Sharing the planet.

Who we are
An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.
-Grade 2 Central idea: Cultures influence communities.

Where we are in place and time
An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.
-Grade 2 Central idea: How our community has been shaped and changes over time

How we express ourselves
An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic
-Grade 2 Central idea: Humans express their discoveries using their senses.

How the world works
An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment
-Grade 2 Central idea: The earth’s materials have a variety of properties that determine their uses.

How We Organize Ourselves
An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment
-Grade 2 Central idea: Humans interact with their environments and create communities to meet their needs.

Sharing the planet
An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.
-Grade 2 Central idea: Animals have an interdependent relationship with people and other animals of the world.

Grade 3 Learning Outcomes

MATH

I can count Missing number sequences

I can count in multiples of 4, 8, 50

I can find:

  • 10 more than any given number up to 1000
  • 10 less than any given number up to 1000
  • 100 more than any given number to 1000
  • 100 less than any given number to 1000

I can read and write numbers in words

I can recognize place value of 3 digit numbers

I can compare and order numbers from 0 up to 1000; using greater than, less than, and = sign

I can round numbers to the nearest 10, 100, 1000

I can identify numbers using different representation (base ten blocks)

I can represent numbers using base ten blocks

I can add numbers mentally, including HTU+U, HTU+T, HTU+H

I can subtract numbers mentally, including HTU+U, HTU+T, HTU+H

I can add numbers:

  • By partitioning 100’s, 10’s and 1’s
  • Up to 3 digit using a formal written method
  • Up to 4 digits using a formal written method

I can subtract numbers up to 3 digits using a formal written method

I can estimate answers with some degree of accuracy in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division

I can solve problems including:

  • Missing number problems (eg. 79 = _ -19)
  • Using place value
  • Addition two-step problems deciding which operation and method to use.
  • Subtraction two-step problems deciding which operation and method to use.

I can solve 2-step word problems involving addition.

I can solve 2-step word problems involving subtraction.

I can recall multiples of 2, 5, 10, 3, 4, 8

I can determine the total number of objects in a set using groups of 2s, 5s, 10s, 3’s, 4’s

I can solve multiplication and division problems using the multiplication table including two-digit to one-digit numbers

I can use the terms ‘product’, ‘quotient’ and ‘remainder’

I can multiply using formal written method numbers with:

  • One digit by one digit
  • Two digits by one digit (cal 3)
  • Three digit by 1 digit with a remainder

I can solve multiplication problems using missing number problems.

I can solve one-step division problems using missing number problems.

I can solve positive integer problems in which n objects are connected to n objects

I can solve correspondence problems in which objects are connected to objects

I can solve 2-step word problems involving 4 operations

I can count up in tenths and down in tenths

I can recognize:

  • that tenths arise from dividing 1 digit numbers by ten
  • that tenths arise from dividing objects into 10 equal parts

I can write equivalent fractions for given fractions

I can recognize equivalent fractions; up to 8 equivalents

I can express fractions in the simplest form

I can compare fractions to a half

I can compare and order unlike fractions

I can add fractions within the same denominator ( e.g. 5/7 + 1/7= 6/7)

I can subtract fractions within the same denominator ( e.g. 5/7 + 1/7= 6/7)

I can compare fractions with the same denominator

I can order fractions with the same denominator.

I can use a diagram to recognize equivalent fractions with denominators less than 10

I can recognize:

  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator of 1
  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator of 2 digits and similar denominators.

I can write:

  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator of 1
  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator of 2 digits and similar denominators

I can find:

  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator with ones as the numerator.
  • Fractions of a set of objects with a numerator of 2 digits and similar denominators.

I can convert measurement to the smaller unit including:

  • Length (cm-mm)
  • Length (m-cm)
  • Weight (kg-g)
  • Volume and capacity (litres- millilitres)

I can add:

  • Lengths
  • Mass
  • Volume and capacity

I can subtract:

  • Lengths
  • Mass
  • Volume and capacity

I can solve word problems involving length/mass/volume/capacity.

I can measure the perimeter of 2-D shapes (square, triangles, rectangles) by counting squares

I can measure in cm2

I can measure in m2

I can use a formula to calculate the area or a rectangle/square (sing 3)

I can solve problems involving

  • Addition of money in the same unit
  • Subtraction of money in the same unit
  • Addition and subtraction giving change

Converting cents into dollars, dollars into cents, reading and writing money in decimal notation

I can estimate time with a degree of accuracy (near the minute)

I can compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours

I know the amount of minutes in an hour, hours in a day, seconds in a minute

I can tell time on an analog clock, a digital clock and a 24- hour clock

I can write the time using analog clock, a digital clock and a 24- hour clock

I can read time using o’clock, a.m/p.m, morning, afternoon, midnight and noon

I can use terms ‘past’ and ‘to’ (eg. 10 min past, 5 min to)

I can identify:

  • Horizontal and vertical lines
  • Pairs of perpendicular and parallel lines

I can draw perpendicular and parallel lines

I can understand 2-D (regular and irregular) shapes including triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and octagons

I can draw:

  • 2-D shapes
  • 3-D shapes using modeling material

I can recognize angles as a property of shapes and as a description of a turn

I can recognize that:

  • 1 right angle makes one quarter turn.
  • 2 right angles make a half turn
  • 3 right angles make three quarters of a turn
  • 4 right angles make a complete turn
  • I can identify right angles

I can identify whether angles are less than or greater than a right angle

I can interpret bar charts, pictograms, and tables

I can present data using bar charts, pictograms, and tables

I can solve one step and two- step questions (E.g. How many more/fewer? Using information found in scaled bar charts, pictograms and tables

I can interpret horizontal and vertical bar graphs

I can read scales

I can complete a bar a graph from given data

 

LITERACY & LANGUAGE ARTS

Foundational Skills

Phonics and Word Recognition

  • I can show what I have learned about letters and sounds by figuring out words.
  • I can find and tell the meanings of most common prefixes and suffixes.
  • I can read words with common suffixes. (-ful, -less, -ly, -tion, -sion)
  • I can read words with more than one syllable.
  • I can read words that aren’t spelled the way they sound.

Fluency

  • I can fluently read and understand books at my level well.
  • I can use what I understand from my reading to help me figure out or correct words I am having trouble with.
  • I can read grade level books and poems aloud accurately, at the right speed and with expression.

Reading – Literature

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can ask and answer questions to show that I understand the stories that I am reading.
  • I can find the answers to specific questions within the stories that I read.
  • I can remember and retell different kinds of stories from many cultures.
  • I can figure out the lessons or morals of the stories that I read and explain that message using details from the story.
  • I can describe characters in stories and explain how their actions affect the story.

Craft and Structure

  • I can figure out the meanings of words or groups of words in stories by thinking about how they are used.
  • I can tell the difference between literal and nonliteral language when I read.
  • I can write and talk about fiction by using the words for the different parts (e.g., chapter, scene, stanza).
  • I can describe how new parts of fiction build on the parts that have already happened.
  • I can tell the difference between what I think and what the author or characters might think in a story.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can explain how the author uses illustrations to help the meaning in a story.
  • I can compare and contrast stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • I can read and understand third grade stories, plays and poems independently.

Reading – Informational Text

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can ask and answer questions to show that I understand the information that I am reading.
  • I can find the answers to specific questions within informational text that I read.
  • I can figure out the main idea of information I read.
  • I can talk about the most important details in the information I read and how they support the main idea.
  • I can describe how some historical events are related.
  • I can describe how some scientific ideas are related.
  • I can describe how the steps in a set of directions is related.

Craft and Structure

  • I can figure out the meanings of words and phrases in science and social studies texts.
  • I can use the parts of a text that stand out to find information quickly.
  • I can use the parts of a text that stand out to find information quickly.
  • I can tell the difference between what I think and what an author writes in informational texts.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can show what I have learned from informational text and illustrations by answering questions about where, when, why and how.
  • I can describe how the sentences and paragraphs in informational text are connected and follow a logical order.
  • I can compare and contrast the most important ideas and details in two pieces of information about the same topic.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • I can read and understand 3rd grade informational texts independently.

Writing

Text Type & Purposes

  • I can write to share my opinion and give reasons to support that opinion.
  • I can write my opinion piece in an organized way that introduces my opinion and lists my reasons.
  • I can give reasons to support my opinion in my writing.
  • I can use linking words (because, therefore, since, for example, etc.) to connect my opinion with my reasons.
  • I can write a conclusion (ending) to my opinion piece.
  • I can write to inform and explain ideas to others clearly.
  • I can write an informative text that introduces my topic and then groups related information together.
  • I can include illustrations in my writing to help others understand my topic better.
  • I can write about a topic using facts, definitions and details.
  • I can use linking words (also, another, and, more, but, etc.) to connect the ideas in my writing.
  • I can use temporal words (first, next, then, finally, etc.) to help others understand the order in my stories.
  • I can write conclusions (endings) to my informative pieces of writing.
  • I can write organized stories that have lots of details.
  • I can write stories from different points of view that have characters and a plot.
  • I can use dialog between my characters and describe their actions & feelings to help others understand the plots of my stories.
  • I can write conclusions (endings) to my stories.

Production and Distribution of Writing

  • I can stay focused and organized in my different types of writing.
  • I can write for different purposes, audiences, and topics.
  • I can plan, revise and edit my writing with the help of peers and adults.
  • I can use technology to create and publish my writing.
  • I can use technology to communicate and work with others.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • I can do short research projects to help me learn more about a topic through investigation.
  • I can remember what I have learned or find new information from books or technology to help me with my research.
  • I can take notes to help me organize the research in my writing.

Range of Writing

  • I can write for short time frames or over a longer period of time depending on my purpose, audience and topic.
  • Speaking & Listening
  • Comprehension & Collaboration
  • I can successfully participate in discussions.
  • I can come to discussions prepared to share my ideas because I have read or studied what I needed to.
  • I can listen, wait to speak until it’s my turn and be respectful of others when I am having discussions.
  • I can ask questions to help me understand discussions, stay on topic and to help me to connect my ideas with other people’s ideas.
  • I can explain my own thinking and ideas after a discussion.
  • I can figure out the main ideas and details of what I see and hear.
  • I can ask and answer questions about what a speaker says so that I can talk more about the topic.

Presentation & Knowledge of Ideas

  • I can give a report or share a story or experience with important details to help others understand.
  • I can speak clearly and at an appropriate speed when I give a report or share a story or experience.
  • I can create engaging recordings of stories or poems to show my fluency in reading.
  • I can speak in complete sentences to make what I am sharing more clear to others.
  • I can create visual presentations to help me share facts and details better.

Language

Conventions of Standard English

  • I can show that I know how to use words correctly when I write and speak.
  • I can explain how nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs work in different sentences.
  • I can use conjunctions in the correct way in my speech and writing.
  • I can say and write simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • I can show that I know how to write sentences correctly.
  • I can use capital letters correctly when I write titles.
  • I can use a dictionary or other resources to check and correct my spelling.
  • I can correctly say, write and use different verb tenses (e.g. I walked; I walk; I will walk).
  • I can correctly say, write and use regular and irregular verbs (action words).
  • I can use commas and quotation marks correctly when I write dialogue between two people or characters.
  • I can use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood, honesty, courage, faith).
  • I can correctly say, write and use all kinds of plural nouns.
  • I can make sure that all of my subjects and verbs go together correctly in the sentences I say and write.
  • I can make sure that all of my pronouns and the nouns they refer to go together correctly in the sentences I say and write.
  • I can correctly use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs correctly in my speech and writing.
  • I can use apostrophes appropriately to show possession.
  • I can use spelling patterns and rules to help me spell new words.
  • I can spell commonly used words correctly and add suffixes to them.

Knowledge of Language

  • I can write, speak, read and listen by using what I know about the English language.
  • I can choose interesting words and phrases to help others understand my meaning better.
  • I can recognize differences between my speaking language and my written language.

Vocabulary Acquisition & Use

  • I can figure out what words mean by using the strategies I know and by thinking about what I have read.
  • I can use context clues to help me understand new words.
  • I can use prefixes and suffixes that I know to help me understand new words.
  • I can use root words I know to help me understand the meanings of new words.
  • I can use print and computer dictionaries to help me find the meanings of new words.
  • I can show that I understand figurative language (e.g. busy as a bee; slow as a snail; you are what you eat).
  • I can figure out how words are related and how their meanings might be similar.
  • I can tell the difference between literal and nonliteral language when I read.
  • I can find real-life connections between words and the way they are used (e.g. people who are friendly or helpful).
  • I can figure out the small differences in meaning with related words that tell about how people feel or how they are acting (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard, wondered).
  • I can use the new words and phrases I have learned in different ways to show that I know what they mean.

 

 

SCIENCE

Life Systems: Plant Growth and Changes (PL)

  • Investigate the growth and development of plants, including the conditions necessary for germination.
  • Analyze the interdependence among plants, individuals, society, and the environment.

Life Systems: Adaptions (AD)

  • Recognize that physical structure or behavior may improve an organism’s chance for survival.

Earth and Space Systems : Weather (WE)

  • Measure and represent local weather, including temperature, wind speed and direction, amount of sunlight, precipitation, relative humidity, and cloud cover.
  • Investigate local, national, and global weather conditions, including the role of air movement and solar energy transfer.
  • Analyze the impact of weather on society and the environment,

Earth and Space Systems: Objects in Space (OS)

  • Objects in the sky move in regular and predictable patterns

Physical Science: Structures and Materials (SM)

  • Investigate properties of materials and methods of joinery used in structures.
  • Assess the function and characteristics of strong, stable, and balanced natural and human-built structures.

Physical Science: Energy and Matter (EM)

  • Recognize that molecules and Atoms exist. Energy and matter have multiple forms and can be changed from one form to another

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

Interactions and Interdependence of Nations (IN)

  • Analyze daily life in a diversity of communities in the USA and around the world.
  • Analyze the cultures and traditions in communities studied.
  • Illustrate examples of interdependence of communities.

 

Dynamic Relationships (DR)

  • Use various model representations of the Earth.
  • Assess the degree to which the geography and related environmental and climatic factors influence ways of living on and with the land in American communities and locally.
  • Compare the beliefs of various communities in the USA and around the world regarding living on and with the land.

 

Power and Authority

  • Compare how decisions are made in the local USA communities and communities studied.
  • Demonstrate awareness that divergent viewpoints may lead to conflict as part of group interactions, and assess various means of conflict resolution.
  • Make generalizations about the purpose and intent of documents that define the rights of children.

 

Resources and Wealth (RW)

  • Appraise the ways communities, including those in the USA, meet their members’ needs and wants.
  • Analyze the creation and distribution of wealth in communities studied.
  • Evaluate the ways in which technologies have impacted daily life in American communities.

 

HEALTH

Personal and Family Health

  • Assessing unsafe situations
  • Asking for help in unsafe situations
  • Dealing with bullying
  • Advocating against bullying
  • Predicting future health
  • Assessing personal health behaviors
  • Setting a goal for positive health behaviors
  • Preventing common diseases—heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and HIV

Safety and Injury Prevention

  • Understanding feelings of being safe
  • Thinking ahead to be safe
  • Teaching others to be safe
  • Getting the right kind of help
  • Setting a goal to be safe
  • Identifying people who can help you reach your goal
  • Advocating to be safe
  • Sharing the safety message with family and others

 

Nutrition and Physical Activity

  • Drinking plenty of water
  • Eating a healthy breakfast
  • Assessing body feelings after eating breakfast
  • Eating 5 fruits and vegetables a day
  • Identifying food choices and influences
  • Selecting healthy food choices
  • Keeping a food diary
  • Evaluating food choices
  • Setting a goal to eat healthy meals
  • Identifying positive personal characteristics
  • Setting a goal to move more and sit less
  • Accessing support to move more and sit less

 

Tobacco and Alcohol Prevention

  • Understanding tobacco and alcohol myths
  • Choosing to be tobacco and alcohol free
  • Identifying support to be tobacco and alcohol free
  • Directing your own tobacco- and alcohol-free life
  • Expressing intentions to be tobacco and alcohol free
  • Turning off the pressure to use tobacco and alcohol
  • Understanding where pressure comes from
  • Saying NO to tobacco and alcohol
  • Advocating for others to be tobacco and alcohol free

 

 

PROJECT TIME

The following six units of inquiry are the foundation of the project time program:

Who we are, Where we are in place and time, How we express ourselves, How the world works, How we organize ourselves, and Sharing the planet.

 

Who we are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

-Grade 3 Central idea: Cultures influence communities.

 

Where we are in place and time

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.

-Grade 3 Central idea: Humans impact the environment and those around them

 

How we express ourselves

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic

-Grade 3 Central idea: Change occurs when people see problems and create solutions.

 

How the world works

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment

-Grade 3 Central idea: Our home planet is unique in the solar system.

 

How We Organize Ourselves

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment

-Grade 3 Central idea: Humans shape their environment to meet their needs and wants.

 

Sharing the planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

-Grade 3 Central idea: Plants are a natural resource and serve a purpose in our lives.