Grades 4-5

Las Tortugas Learning Outcomes

Grade 4 Learning Outcomes (scroll down for grade 5)

Core concepts and outcomes are listed below by subject. For more detailed information on indicators, please contact the school.

MATH LEARNING OUTCOMES

Counting

  • I can find 1000 more than a given number
  • I can find 1000 less than a given number

Place Value

  • I can recognize place value of digits in 5 digit places
    I can compare and order numbers using greater than, less than, and equal signs ( > < = ) up to 10,000
  • I can round numbers to the nearest 1,000

Interpreting Data

  • I can interpret horizontal and vertical bar graphs
  • I can solve sum and difference problems using information presented in:
    pictograms bar charts, tables and other graphs

Representing Numbers

  • I can add numbers up to 4 digits using a formal written method
  • I can subtract numbers:
    Up to 4 digits using a formal written method
  • I can add numbers with 1 decimal place
    I can subtract numbers with 1 decimal place

Problem Solving Addition & Subtraction

  • I can use inverse operations to check my answers.

Factors and Multiples

  • I can determine if a 1-digit number is a factor of a given number.
  • I can list all factors of a given number up to 100

Written Multiplication and Division

  • I can multiply using formal written method numbers with three digits by one digit
  • I can divide using formal written method numbers with three digits by one digit and three digits by 1 digit with a remainder
  • I can solve 3-step problems in context and decide which operations and methods to use
  • I can estimate and check answers within multiplication and division.

Problem Solving Multiplication & Division

  • I can solve positive integer problems in which n objects are connected to m objects
    (Correspondence problems)

Time

  • I can convert between units of time including hours to minutes, minutes to hours, years to months, weeks to days

Measurement

  • I can convert measurement to the smaller unit including length (km-m)
  • I can measure the perimeter of 2-D shapes using meters

Recognizing Fractions

  • I can count up in hundredths, down in hundredths
  • I can recognize that hundredths arise from dividing numbers by 100 and that hundredths arise from dividing tenths by 10
  • I can express:
    An improper fraction as a mixed number
    A mixed number as an improper fraction
    An improper fraction/mixed number in the simplest form

Finding Fractions of Quantities

  • I can solve problems by calculating quantities with:
    Smaller fractions (1/2,1/4,1/3, ¾)
    Fractions with a denominator up to 12ths
    The answer equaling a whole
  • I can use unit fractions to divide quantities

Fraction Calculation

  • I can add and subtract fractions with increasing denominator
  • I can add and subtract fractions with up to 2 different denominators

Decimals as Fraction Amounts

  • I can recognize decimal equivalents of any number in the tenths
  • I can recognize decimal equivalents of any number in the hundredths
  • I can recognize decimal equivalents to ¼,1/2, 3/4
  • I can write decimal equivalents of any number in the tenths
  • I can write decimal equivalents of any number in the hundredths
  • I can write decimal equivalents to ¼,1/2, ¾
  • I can identify the value of each digit up to 2 decimal places. (E.g. 1.23 = ones, tenths, hundredths)
  • I can use the number line to display decimals
  • I can compare and order decimals in the hundredths
  • I can round decimals to:
    The nearest whole number
    1 decimal place
    2 decimal places

Properties of Shapes

  • I can draw 2-D shapes given different dimensions and angles
  • I can compare shapes including Quadrilaterals and Triangles based on their properties and sizes
  • I can identify the line of symmetry in 2-D shapes (including different orientations)
  • I can draw a simple symmetrical figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry
  • I can illustrate and name parts of a circle including radius, diameter, circumference
  • I know that the diameter is twice the radius of a circle

Angles

  • I can identify whether angles are less than or greater than a right angle (acute and obtuse)
  • I can recognize that:
    1 right angle makes one quarter turn. (90*)
    2 right angles make a half turn (180*)
    3 right angles make three quarters of a turn (270*)
    4 right angles make a complete turn (360*)
  • I can compare and order angles up to 2 right angles (angles under 90 degrees)

 

LITERACY & LANGUAGE ARTS

Foundational Skills

Phonics and Word Recognition

  • I can read unfamiliar words that have more than one syllable.
  • I can show what I have learned about letters, sounds and words in my reading.

Fluency

  • I can fluently read and understand books at my level well.
  • I can use what I understand from my reading to help me figure out or correct words I am having trouble with.
  • I can read grade level books and poems aloud accurately, at the right speed and with expression, rereading as necessary.

 

Reading – Literature

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can explain a story by referring to details and examples in the text.
  • I can figure out the theme of a fiction text by thinking about the details in the text.
  • I can summarize a fiction text in my own words.
  • I can use specific details in fiction text to help me describe a character, setting or event in the story.

Craft and Structure

  • I can figure out the meanings of words or groups of words in stories by thinking about how they are used.
  • I can write or talk about the differences between poems, plays and fictional stories.
  • I can refer to specific elements of poems (verse, rhythm, meter) and plays (characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when I write or talk about a piece of fiction.
  • I can compare and contrast different stories by thinking about the points of view from which they are told.
  • I can tell the difference between first- and third- person narrators.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can make connections between a written text and a visual or oral presentation of the same text.
  • I can compare and contrast how authors from different cultures write about similar themes (e.g., good vs. evil) in stories, myths and traditional literature.

 

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • I can read and understand fourth grade stories, plays and poems independently.

 

Reading – Informational Text

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can draw inferences from informational texts by referring to details and examples from the text.
  • I can figure out the main idea in informational texts.
  • I can explain how the main idea in informational texts is supported by the details in the text.
  • I can use my own words to summarize informational texts I have read.
  • I can read about and explain historical events and tell why they happened using information that was given in the text.
  • I can read about a scientific procedure, idea or concept and explain what and why it happened using information that was given in the text.
  • I can read about a technical procedure, idea or concept and explain what and why it happened using information that was given in the text.

Craft and Structure

  • I can figure out the meanings of words and phrases in science and social studies texts.
  • I can describe the organization (e.g., time order, comparison, cause & effect or problem & solution) of events, ideas, concepts or information in informational texts.
  • I can compare and contrast the information given in a firsthand account (a person who was present) and secondhand account (a person who was not present, but was told) of the same event or topic.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can figure out, understand and use information from charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations or other internet presentations to help me explain my understanding of informational texts.
  • I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in informational texts.
  • I can use information from two different informational texts on the same topic to help me write or speak with knowledge about the topic.
  • I can draw on information from multiple print (dictionary, thesaurus, textbook, website) or digital sources to locate an answer to a question quickly.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • I can read and understand 4th grade informational texts independently.

 

Writing

 

Text Type & Purposes

  • I can write to share my opinion on topics or texts and provide reasons and information to support that opinion.
  • I can write my opinion in an organized way that introduces my topic clearly, states my opinion, and groups related ideas together.
  • I can give reasons that are supported by facts and details when writing my opinion.
  • I can write a conclusion (ending) that is related to the opinion I present.
  • I can write to inform and explain ideas to others clearly.
  • I can write an informative text that introduces my topic and then groups related information together in paragraphs or sections.
  • I can include special formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations and multimedia in my writing to help others understand my topic better.
  • I can connect my opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).
  • I can use dialog and description to develop experiences and events or to show how the characters respond to different situations in the story.
  • I can provide an introduction in my stories that creates a situation, introduces a narrator & characters and organizes a plot that unfolds naturally.
  • I can develop a topic using facts, definitions, details, quotations or other information and examples.
  • I can connect related ideas using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because).
  • I can write a conclusion (ending) that makes sense with the experiences and events I shared in my story.
  • I can write a conclusion (ending) that is related to the information or explanation I present.
  • I can use very specific words and phrases, as well as sensory details, to express experiences and events.
  • I can use precise wording and specific vocabulary to teach others about a topic.
  • I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  • I can orient the reader by establishing a situation, introducing a narrator and/or characters, and organizing an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  • I can write for different purposes, audiences, and topics.
  • I can plan, revise and edit my writing with the help of peers and adults.
  • I can use technology to create and publish my writing.
  • I can use technology to communicate and work with others.
  • I can produce clear and organized writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.
  • I can use appropriate keyboarding skills to type at least one page of my writing in a single sitting.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • I can do short research projects to help me learn more about a topic through investigation.
  • I can remember what I have learned or find new information from books or technology to help me with my research.
  • I can provide a list of sources that I used for gathering information for my writing.
  • I can gather evidence from fiction or informational text to support my investigation, thinking and research.

Range of Writing

  • I can write with stamina for short time frames or over a longer period of time depending on my purpose, audience and topic.

 

Speaking & Listening

Comprehension & Collaboration

  • I can successfully participate in discussions.
  • I can come to discussions prepared to share my ideas because I have read or studied what I needed to.
  • I can listen, wait to speak until it’s my turn and be respectful of others when I am having discussions.
  • I can follow agreed-upon rules for discussion and carry out my assigned role.
  • I can ask and answer questions to help me understand discussions, stay on topic and that contribute to others’ ideas and remarks.
  • I can think about what is discussed and explain any new thinking that I have.
  • I can use what I know and what I have read to explore new ideas about a topic during a discussion.
  • I can build on others’ ideas and express my own ideas clearly.
  • I can paraphrase or summarize text that is read aloud or information that is presented to me.
  • I can identify the reasons or evidence that a speaker gives to support his/her points.

Presentation & Knowledge of Ideas

  • I can report on a topic or tell a story with correct and appropriate facts and details to support my main idea.
  • I can speak clearly and at an appropriate speed when I give a report or share a story or experience.
  • I can create engaging recordings of stories or poems to show my fluency in reading.
  • I can create engaging audio recordings or visual displays to help me better explain a main idea or theme when necessary.
  • I can figure out when to use formal English and when it is appropriate to use informal English.

 

Language

Conventions of Standard English

  • I can show that I know how to use words correctly when I write and speak, demonstrating the command of the conventions of English grammar when writing or speaking.
  • I can explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
  • I can correctly use a comma before a conjunction when connecting two simple sentences.
  • I can say and write simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • I can show that I know how to write sentences correctly.
  • I can correctly use capitalization in all of my writing.
  • I can correctly write and use progressive verb tenses (e.g., I was talking, I am talking, I will be talking).
  • I can use commas and quotation marks to show direct speech and quotations from a text.
  • I can use auxiliary words to show different conditions (e.g., can, may, must).
  • I can use the common patterns I have learned about adjectives to order them correctly in sentences.
  • I can correctly write and use prepositional phrases.
  • I can recognize inappropriate sentence fragments and run on sentences.
  • I can correctly use commonly confused words (e.g., to, too, two; their & there).

Knowledge of Language

  • I can write, speak, read and listen by using what I know about the English language.
  • I can choose interesting words and phrases to help others understand my meaning better.
  • I can recognize differences between my speaking language and my written language.
  • I can choose various punctuation to help me show different moods in writing.
  • I can figure out when I need to use formal speech and when I can use informal speech.

Vocabulary Acquisition & Use

  • I can figure out what words mean by using the strategies I know and by thinking about what I have read.
  • I can use context clues to help me understand new words.
  • I can use root words I know to help me understand the meanings of new words.
  • I can determine the meanings of unknown words by using what I know about common Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes and roots.
  • I can use print and computer dictionaries to help me find the meanings of new words.
  • I can show that I understand figurative language (e.g. busy as a bee; slow as a snail; you are what you eat).
  • I can explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
  • I can figure out how words are related and how their meanings might be similar.
  • I can recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages and proverbs.
  • I can figure out and use fourth grade words that show specific actions, emotions or states of being.
  • I can understand words by relating them to their antonyms and synonyms.
  • I can figure out and use grade-level words that are centered around a specific topic.

 

SCIENCE

Life Science: Habitats and Communities

  • Investigate the interdependence of plants and animals, including humans, within habitats and communities.
  • Analyze the structures and behaviors of plants and animals that enable them to exist in various habitats.
  • Assess the effects of natural and human activities on habitats and communities, and propose actions to maintain or restore habitats.

Earth and Space Science: Rocks, Minerals, and Erosion

  • Investigate physical properties of rocks and minerals, including those found in the local environment.
  • Assess how human uses of rocks and minerals impact self, society, and the environment.
  • Analyze how weathering, erosion, and fossils provide evidence to support human understanding of the formation of landforms on Earth.

Physical Science: Light and Electrical devices

  • Investigate the characteristics and physical properties of natural and artificial sources of light in the environment.
  • Analyze how light interacts with different objects and materials to create phenomena such as shadows, reflection, refraction, and dispersion.
  • Assess personal, societal, and environmental impacts of light-related technological innovations including optical devices.
  • Explain and model magnetism and the many useful applications in everyday life.

Physical Science: Sound

  • Explore natural and artificial sources of sound in the environment and how those sounds are detected by humans and animals.
  • Draw conclusions about the characteristics and physical properties of sound, including pitch and loudness, based on observation.
  • Assess personal, societal, and environmental impacts of sound-related technologies.

Physical Science: Pulleys and Gears

  • Evaluate the impact of pulleys and gears on society and the environment
  • Investigate ways in which pulleys and gears modify the speed and direction of, and the force exerted on, moving objects.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Interactions and Interdependence of Nations

  • Analyze how Nicaraguan people have shaped and continue to shape Nicaragua.
  • Examine the social roles and cultural diversity that existed in Mesoamerican ancient civilizations (Mayan, Aztec, Inca).

 

Dynamic Relationships

  • Correlate the impact of the land on the lifestyles and settlement patterns of the people of Nicaragua and Mesoamerican ancient civilizations including the Mayan, Inca and Aztec.
  • Students demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic features that define places and regions in Nicaragua
  • Describe ways ancient Mesoamerican civilizations exchanged goods and services.

Power and Authority

  • Analyze the relationship between governance institutions in Nicaragua and the quality of life of people in the country.
  • Students understand the structures, functions, and powers of the local, municipal, and federal governments.
  • Analyze the governing systems of the Mesoamerican civilizations (Mayan, Inca and Aztecs).

Resources and Wealth

  • Analyze the strategies the Mayan, Inca and Aztec people have developed to meet the challenges presented by the natural environment.
  • Investigate the importance of agriculture to the economy and culture of Nicaragua.

 

HEALTH

Personal and Family Health

  • Understanding stress
  • Evaluating stressful situations
  • Dealing with stress in healthy ways
  • Understanding conflict
  • Managing conflict in healthy ways
  • Understanding a growing and changing body
  • Dealing with growing up
  • Assessing talents and skills
  • Predicting your future
  • Setting a goal to be healthy
  • Getting help with growing up and changing

Safety and Injury Prevention

  • Understanding risk taking
  • Assessing good and bad risks
  • Planning ahead to be safe
  • Assessing feelings about risks
  • Identifying safe people and places
  • Assessing feelings
  • Responding to signals that something is wrong
  • Understanding personal support
  • Understanding when to get personal support
  • Accessing personal support
  • Resisting peer pressure and dares

Nutrition and Physical Activity

  • Eating healthy
  • Using MyPlate to eat healthy
  • Understanding that different foods help the body in different ways
  • Understanding how much to eat from each food group
  • Setting a goal to eat healthy and exercise
  • Keeping a food and exercise journal
  • Analyzing influences on body image
  • Liking your body

Tobacco and Alcohol Prevention

  • Identifying reasons to say NO to tobacco and alcohol
  • Advocating to be tobacco and alcohol free
  • Understanding issues about tobacco and alcohol
  • Analyzing media influences to use tobacco and alcohol
  • Saying NO to tobacco and alcohol as a healthy choice
  • Demonstrating effective tobacco and alcohol resistance skills
  • Helping others say NO to tobacco and alcohol

 

PROJECT TIME

Who we are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

  • Examine the social roles and cultural diversity that existed in Mesoamerican ancient civilizations (Mayan, Aztec, Inca).

Where we are in place and time

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives

  • Correlate the impact of the land on the lifestyles and settlement patterns of the people of Nicaragua and Mesoamerican ancient civilizations including the Mayan, Inca and Aztec.
  • Students demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic features that define places and regions in Nicaragua.
  • Analyze how weathering, erosion, and fossils provide evidence to support human understanding of the formation of landforms on Earth

How we express ourselves

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic

  • Explore natural and artificial sources of sound in the environment and how those sounds are detected by humans and animals.
  • Draw conclusions about the characteristics and physical properties of sound, including pitch and loudness, based on observation.
  • Assess personal, societal, and environmental impacts of sound-related technologies.

How the world works

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment

  • Investigate the interdependence of plants and animals, including humans, within habitats and communities. E,f,g,h,i. k=final project
  • Analyze the structures and behaviors of plants and animals that enable them to exist in various habitats.

How we organize ourselves

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment

  • Analyze the relationship between governance institutions in Nicaragua and the quality of life of people in the country.
  • Students understand the structures, functions, and powers of the local, municipal, and federal governments.
  • Analyze the governing systems of the Mesoamerican civilizations (Mayan, Inca and Aztecs).

Sharing the planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

  • Assess the effects of natural and human activities on habitats and communities, and propose actions to maintain or restore habitat
  • Analyze the strategies the Mayan, Inca and Aztec people have developed to meet the challenges presented by the natural environment.
  • Investigate the importance of agriculture to the economy and culture of Nicaragua.
  • Describe ways ancient Mesoamerican civilizations exchanged goods and services.

 

GRADE 5 LEARNING OUTCOMES

English Language Arts Outcomes

Foundational Skills

Phonics and Word Recognition

  • I can use combined knowledge of all letter sound correspondences, syllabication patterns and morphology (roots & affixes) to read unfamiliar multisyllabic words both in and out of context.

Fluency

  • I can fluently read and understand books at my level well.
  • I can use what I understand from my reading to help me figure out or correct words I am having trouble with.
  • I can read grade level books and poems aloud accurately, at the right speed and with expression, rereading as necessary.
  • I can read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension, using context to know if I am reading accurately and can self-correct when necessary.

Reading – Literature

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • I can determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
  • I can compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g. how characters interact).

Craft and Structure

  • I can describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can explain how the elements of visual and multimedia presentations enhance my understanding and appreciation of text.
  • I can compare and contrast stories in the same genre on their approaches to simlar themes and topics.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • By the end of the year, I can read and comprehend literature at the high end of grades 4-5 text independently and proficiently.

Reading – Informational Text

Key Ideas & Details

  • I can quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • I can determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • I can explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Craft and Structure

  • I can describe the organization (e.g., time order, comparison, cause & effect or problem & solution) of events, ideas, concepts or information in informational texts.
  • I can use context clues and non-linguistic cues (maps, charts, etc) to determine the meaning of unknown words.
  • I can determine the appropriate definition of words that have more than one meaning.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • I can figure out, understand and use information from charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations or other internet presentations to help me explain my understanding of informational texts.
  • I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in informational texts.
  • I can use information from two different informational texts on the same topic to help me write or speak with knowledge about the topic.
  • I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Writing

Text Type & Purposes

  • I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, determining my opinion, and supporting a point of view with facts and details when writing an argument.
  • I can introduce a topic clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose, supported by facts and details, and provide a concluding statement with the opinion.
  • I can write an informative text that introduces my topic and then groups related information together in paragraphs or sections.
  • I can include special formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations and multimedia in my writing to help others understand my topic better.
  • I can connect my opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).
  • I can select a topic and gather information to share with my audience.
  • I can explain my topic using precise language and domain-specific vocabulary, presenting my information in a formal style with a concluding statement or section that relates to the information presented.
  • I can use narrative techniques such as dialogue, description, pacing, transitional words, and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

Production and Distribution of Writing

I can produce clear and organized writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

I can use appropriate keyboarding skills to type at least one page of my writing in a single sitting.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • I can do short research projects to help me learn more about a topic through investigation.
  • I can remember what I have learned or find new information from books or technology to help me with my research.

Range of Writing

  • I can write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single setting or day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking & Listening

Comprehension & Collaboration

  • I can come to discussions prepared to share my ideas because I have read or studied what I needed to.
  • I can engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • I can listen, wait to speak until it’s my turn and be respectful of others when I am having discussions.
  • I can build on others’ ideas and express my own ideas clearly.
  • I can paraphrase or summarize text that is read aloud or information that is presented to me.
  • I can identify the reasons or evidence that a speaker gives to support his/her points.

Presentation & Knowledge of Ideas

  • I can report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes.
  • I can speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • I can include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • I can figure out when to use formal English and when it is appropriate to use informal English.

Language

Conventions of Standard English

  • I can show that I know how to use words correctly when I write and speak, demonstrating the command of the conventions of English grammar when writing or speaking.
  • I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • I can use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

Knowledge of Language

Vocabulary Acquisition & Use

  • I can use root words I know to help me understand the meanings of new words.
  • I can determine the meanings of unknown words by using what I know about common Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes and roots.
  • I can use print and computer dictionaries to help me find the meanings of new words.
  • I can show that I understand figurative language (e.g. busy as a bee; slow as a snail; you are what you eat).
  • I can explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
  • I can figure out how words are related and how their meanings might be similar.
  • I can figure out and use grade-level words that are centered around a specific topic.

Math Learning Outcomes

Counting
I am learning to count numbers.

  • I can count forward and backwards in powers of 10 from any given number up to 1,000,000.
  • I can count in intervals across zero.
  • I can count backwards in intervals across zero including negative numbers

Place Value
I am learning to recognize value of digits, compare, round, and order numbers.

  • I can recognize place value of digits in 6 digit places
  • I can compare and order numbers using greater than, less than, and equal signs ( > < = ) up to 100,000
  • I can round numbers to the nearest 10,000

Interpreting Data
I am learning to extract info from data

  • I can interpret horizontal and vertical bar graphs
  • I can construct a bar graph

Representing Numbers
I am learning to add and subtract numbers using different methods

  • I can add numbers up to 4 digits using a formal written method
  • I can subtract numbers up to 4 digits using a formal written method
  • I can add numbers with 2 decimal places
  • I can subtract numbers with 2 decimal places

Problem Solving Addition & Subtraction
I am learning to use the four operations to solve problems

  • I can solve 2 step problems in context deciding which operation(s) and method(s) to use.
  • I can add and subtract numbers in the decimal
    places with:
    – similar decimals (2.16+ 3.67)
    – unlike decimals (24.1+3.67)
  • I can add and subtract negative numbers.

Written Multiplication and Division
I am learning to multiply and divide using formal written method numbers

  • I can multiply using formal written method numbers with four digits by one digit
  • I can divide using formal written method numbers with four digits by 1 digit
    I can use long division
  • I can solve 3-step problems in context and decide which operations and methods to use
  • I can estimate and check answers within multiplication and division.
  • I can multiply and divide decimals (up to 3 decimal
    places) by 10, 100, 1,000.

Problem Solving Multiplication & Division
I am learning to solve multiplication and division problems using formal written methods.

  • I can use the order of operations to solve:
    – 2 operation problems
    – 3 operation problems
    – 4 operation problems
    – 4 operation problems with brackets
  • I can find the factor pairs of numbers.
  • I can identify prime numbers up to 100

Measurement
I am learning to compare, measure, and record length/height, weight/mass, capacity/volume, area/perimeter

  • I can measure the perimeter of composite rectangular shapes in cm and m
  • I can use a formula to calculate the area of a rectangle (including squares) using cm square and m squared.
  • I can estimate area of irregular shapes.
  • I can find all the possibilities for length and width from a given perimeter (eg. 24cm squared can be 12cmx2cm, 4cmx6cm…)

Recognizing Fractions
I am learning to recognize fractions.

I can represent mixed numbers and improper
fractions using pictorial representation.

Finding Fractions of Quantities
I am learning to recognize, write and find fractions of a quantity.

  • I can simplify fractions by using common factors.
  • I can use common multiples to express fractions in the same denominator
  • I can compare and order fractions:
    – With the same denominator
    – With common multiples as denominators
    – With improper fractions and mixed numbers
    greater than 1
  • I can name equivalent fractions of a given fraction including pictorial representation
    • I can represent 10ths as a fraction
    • I can represent 100ths as a fraction

Fraction Calculation
I am learning to use the four operations with fractions

  • I can add and subtract fractions by finding one equivalent denominator
  • I can multiply simple fractions:
    – With a 1 as the numerator
    – With numerators greater than 1
    – With numerators greater than 1 and simplify my answers
  • I can multiply proper fractions by whole numbers using materials and diagrams
  • I can multiply fractions by fractions with 1 as the numerator
  • I can divide proper fractions by whole numbers (e.g. 1/3 divided 4= 1/12×4=1/3)

Decimals as Fraction Amounts
I am learning to recognize and write decimal equivalents

  • I can read numbers up to 3 decimal places
    I can write numbers up to 3 decimal places
  • I can order numbers up to 3 decimal places
  • I can order decimals in the:
    – Hundredths related to thousandths and tenths
    – Thousandths related to tenths
  • I can read decimal numbers as fractions in the:
    – Tenths
    – Hundredths
    – Thousandths
  • I can write decimal numbers as fractions in the:
    – Tenths
    – Hundredths
    – Thousandths
  • I can solve problems involving numbers up to three decimal places

Percentages
I am learning to calculate percentages

  • I can recognize the percent symbol (%) and understand it represents parts per hundred
  • I can write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal

 

SCIENCE

Life Science: Structures of living things

  • Plants and animals have structures for respiration, digestion, waste disposal, and transport of materials.

Life Science: Human Body Systems (HBS)

  • Analyze personal and societal requirements for, and the impact of, maintaining a healthy human body.
  • Investigate the structure, function, and major organs of one or more human body systems such as the digestive, excretory, respiratory, circulatory, nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems.
  • Assess how multiple human body systems function together to enable people to move, grow, and react to stimuli.

Earth and Space Systems: Conservation of Energy and Resources (ER)

  • Analyze the long-term impacts on society and the environment of human uses of energy and natural resources, and suggest ways to reduce these impacts
  • Identify the various forms of energy (e.g. electrical, chemical, mechanical, heat, light, kinetic.)

Earth and Space Systems: Environmental Science: Water and Air (WA)

  • Identify the properties of air, its properties and uses.
  • Analyze the water on earth, how it moves between ocean and land through the processes of evaporation and condensation

Physical Science: Properties and Changes of Material and Matter (MC)

  • Investigate the characteristics and physical properties of materials in solid, liquid, and gaseous states of matter.
  • Investigate how reversible and non-reversible changes, including changes of state, alter materials.
  • Assess how the production, use, and disposal of raw materials and manufactured products affects self, society, and the environment.
  • Elements and their combinations account for all the varied types of matter in the world. (Periodic Table)

Physical Science: Forces and Simple Machines (FM)

  • Analyze the effects of gravitational, magnetic, and mechanical forces, including friction, on the movement of objects.
  • Investigate characteristics of simple machines, including levers, wheels and axles, pulleys, inclined planes, screws, and wedges, for moving and lifting loads.
  • Assess how natural and man-made forces and simple machines affect individuals, society, and the environment.

 

 

HEALTH

Personal and Family Health

  • identifying feelings associated with puberty
  • assessing personal, physical and emotional changes
  • understanding puberty
  • responding to concerns during puberty
  • shaping peer norms that value different feelings, changes and choices during puberty
  • understanding and caring for a boy’s body
  • understanding and caring for a girl’s body
  • understanding menstruation
  • communicating respectfully
  • valuing personal reputation and abstinence
  • shaping peer norms that value choices that respect and protect one’s future
  • getting help with concerns and challenges of puberty
  • examining issues related to puberty

 

 

Safety and Injury Prevention

  • valuing being safe at school
  • expressing personal rights and responsibilities for being safe at school
  • practicing school safety procedures
  • analyzing media messages
  • understanding casual cruelty
  • taking a stand against media violence and casual cruelty at school
  • recognizing signs of bullying
  • understanding reasons for bullying
  • identifying feelings of victims of bullying
  • preventing and stopping bullying
  • reporting bullying
  • understanding why fights happen
  • valuing not fighting
  • identifying feelings around fights
  • recognizing influence of peers on school fights
  • preventing and avoiding school fights
  • helping a friend or classmate who is in trouble
  • expressing intentions to help create a safe school
  • shaping peer norms that value safe schools

Nutrition and Physical Activity

  • understanding healthy eating guidelines
  • eating healthy foods in the right amounts
  • assessing personal food choices
  • eating healthy on special occasions and when eating out
  • shaping peer norms that value healthy eating
  • shaping peer norms that value exercise and physical activity
  • recognizing the importance of exercise and physical activity
  • understanding guidelines for exercise and physical activity
  • identifying potential barriers to exercise and ways to overcome them
  • assessing personal exercise and physical activity
  • setting a goal to eat healthy and exercise
  • tracking progress toward healthy eating and exercise goals
  • managing personal exercise and nutrition programs
  • staying motivated to exercise and eat healthy

Tobacco, Alcohol, and Other Drug Prevention

  • identifying negative effects of alcohol on the body and brain
  • understanding alcohol and addiction
  • understanding the danger of alcohol experimentation
  • expressing intentions to not experiment with alcohol
  • connecting alcohol use and feelings
  • understanding the influence of peers on alcohol use
  • connecting personal choices, consequences and alcohol use
  • analyzing the influence of media on alcohol use
  • identifying reasons to be alcohol free
  • using peer power to keep self and others alcohol free
  • recognizing alcohol abuse
  • getting help when family members abuse alcohol
  • expressing intentions to be alcohol free
  • helping others be alcohol free
  • shaping peer norms that value being alcohol free

 

PROJECT TIME

Who We Are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

Describe Nicaragua/USA/Canadian and other countries political evolution including the course and consequences of revolutions.

  • Students describe the people and events associated with the development of Nicaragua, USA, Canada and other countries.
  • Explain the purposes and functions of governance structures in the Nicaragua, Canada, USA, other countries, including First Nations systems.

 

 

Where We Are in Place and Time

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the pre-Columbian settlements; their heritage and traditions in a country of your choosing.
  • Describe the cooperation and conflict that existed among the Native Americans/Indigenous people and between the Indian nations and the new settlers
  • Analyze the evolution of the Nicaragua, USA, Canada and other countries as a multicultural nations.
  • Identify the European influence on pre-American/Nicaraguan/Canada and other countries Independence on society.

 

How We Express Ourselves

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

  • Investigate characteristics of simple machines, including levers, wheels and axles, pulleys, inclined planes, screws, and wedges, for moving and lifting loads.
  • Analyze the effects of gravitational, magnetic, and mechanical forces, including friction, on the movement of objects.
  • Identify the various forms of energy (e.g. electrical, chemical, mechanical, heat, light, kinetic.)

 

How the World Works

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment

  • Analyze personal and societal requirements for, and the impact of, maintaining a healthy human body.
  • Investigate the structure, function, and major organs of one or more human body systems such as the digestive, excretory, respiratory, circulatory, nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems.
  • Assess how multiple human body systems function together to enable people to move, grow, and react to stimuli.
  • Plants and animals have structures for respiration, digestion, waste disposal, and transport of materials.

 

How We Organize Ourselves

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment

  • Analyze the historic and contemporary relationship of people to land in Nicaragua, USA and other countries.
  • Develop an understanding of the nature of the treaty relationship between First Nations in countries (Australia, Canada and American and the federal government.

 

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

  • Explain the importance of sustainable management of the environment to the future.

 

  • Assess how the production, use, and disposal of raw materials and manufactured products affects self, society, and the environment.
  • Analyze the long-term impacts on society and the environment of human uses of energy and natural resources, and suggest ways to reduce these impacts
  • Assess how natural and man-made forces and simple machines affect individuals, society, and the environment

 

Social Studies Outcomes

Interactions and Interdependence of Nations

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the pre-Columbian settlements; their heritage and traditions in the USA.
  • Describe the cooperation and conflict that existed among the Native Americans and between the Indian nations and the new settlers.
  • Analyze the evolution of the USA as a multicultural nation.

Dynamic Relationships

  • Analyze the historic and contemporary relationship of people to land in the USA.
  • Identify the European influence on pre-American Independence on society.

Power and Authority

  • Describe USA’s political evolution including the course and consequences of the American Revolution.
  • Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic.
  • Explain the purposes and functions of governance structures in the USA, including Native Americans systems.
  • Develop an understanding of the nature of the treaty relationship between Native Americans and the American federal government.

Resources and Wealth

  • Explain the importance of sustainable management of the environment to the future.